Drone Bans

Technology is amazing. It brought us smartphones, let us meet potential mates with online dating sites, and even allowed people to sit in for one class from halfway across the world. The latest technology updates also brought us the age of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), the most popular one being drones.

First, let’s talk about Drones

Drones are cool. They can fly over places we can’t see and perform some of the riskier functions so that people don’t have to. Like look over enemy territory to spot terrorists or observe a radiated area.q

In the past, we’ve had three types of drones. Type number one is the advanced model used for military maneuvers. Number two consists of the more popular ‘toy’ drones, the kind you might see hovering over a park. The third type of drone, a cross between the other two, is the one people use commercially. For example, the one professional agriculturalists and photographers use to take aerial photos.

What next, with increased Drone Bans and Regulation?

Drones, like any other machine, can break down or malfunction and cause accidents and injuries. Because of this, countries like Sweden and the US have opted to regulate them while others such Thailand have done with them altogether with city area Drone Bans. As more countries ban and regulate drones, how will the future of drones look like?

Drones are here to stay, period. Why do more companies enter the niche each year? Because it’s well-paying. These firms wouldn’t want to give up their primary money-makers, so they’re more likely to equip drones with the latest technology updates and produce more of them than quit the industry. As nations require drones to fly away from cities, demand for toy drones may decline, but demand for commercial drones will rise. q

So perhaps it s good time to invest in infrastructure drones making companies and shy away from the toy or amateur photographer side. After all if you can only fly them in open parks, the demand will decline a lot.